living with anxiety, anxiety, mental health, five ways to bounce back from an anxious attack

Five ways to bounce back after an anxious attack

There’s nothing more disheartening than thinking you’ve somehow managed to get to grasp with your anxiety, so much so you’ve got solid coping mechanisms, only to one day experience an attack. Though it feels as like you’ve taken several steps back, truth be told you haven’t.

You’ve identified the attack, and that’s the first step.

living with anxiety, anxiety, mental health, five ways to bounce back from an anxious attackEver heard the term triggered? It applies in this situation, anxiety is something that’s caused mostly by cognition, how you think, and the environment around you. It’s often chronic, and the symptoms tend to be recurring, so don’t beat yourself up when you have an attack.

It’s happened. The most important thing is what’s next?

living with anxiety, anxiety, mental health, five ways to bounce back from an anxious attackHaving people, be it friends, family, chosen family, you feel comfortable to talk to about your anxiety is ridiculously helpful. Just that simple, are you okay? Makes a huge difference. It’s a chance to trace back and truly explore what happened without feeling judged.

living with anxiety, anxiety, mental health, five ways to bounce back from an anxious attackWatch the sunset, the sunrise, simply do nothing but observe. Don’t commentate, let the senses do the talking. Or take a mindful walk. Hearing your breath is like a child listening to a mother’s heartbeat.

living with anxiety, anxiety, mental health, five ways to bounce back from an anxious attackThere’s no point disputing. This one has been scientifically proven, but it doesn’t mean every day crunch. Exercise regularly but chose one that’s best suited for you.

For example, mine is simply yoga for the sole purpose that it doesn’t feel like exercise. It feels like one gigantic stretch in all the right places.

living with anxiety, anxiety, mental health, five ways to bounce back from an anxious attackWhere did I go wrong? What was my trigger? What happened? You need to be honest with yourself and look for the catalyst to your attack.

This is an important stage as it always ensures growth, because naturally the next step is, how do I prevent this from happening again.

 

Author’s Note: In the spirits of healthier thought processes, I will be trying CBT, cognitive behaviour therapy, as of this week. A good friend of mine suggested this workbook called, ‘Retrain Your Brain Cognitive Therapy in 7 Weeks’ by Seth J. Gillihan. I will be reviewing the process itself, so do keep an eye out!

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